Space Biology Research Paper

What is Gravitational Research?

The effects of gravity on biology and physical systems have been acknowledged since Galileo’s time, but it has only been since the 1960s that gravitational biologists and physical scientists could also explore an environment where the force of gravity can be removed. It was quickly realized that the near-absence of gravity has a fundamentally unique effect on many biological and physical systems that cannot be investigated for any duration of time on Earth.  With the birth of the space age, the opportunity for experimentation over the full spectrum of gravity levels became a reality, and a new environment and research tool became available. Our goal is to explore the response of biology and physical systems to novel environments, and to understand biological and physical phenomena associated with changes in gravitational signals - especially those associated with spaceflight and analogs for extraterrestrial environments.



We seek to expand the knowledge of the impact of these environments on biology and physical systems, and to mentor the next generation of scientists and engineers. We are scientists in academic, commercial and federal laboratories seeking to understand how gravity shapes our world. Gravity is a fundamental force in which the effects on biological and physical systems are not well understood. Understanding how gravity acts upon fundamental life and physical world mechanisms parlays into thousands of applications. For space exploration to succeed, this requires a better grasp of gravity.



This includes key insights into osteoporosis, calcium signal transduction, muscle metabolism, combustion, fluid physics, and quantum gases obtained through research in microgravity environments. This research has given us a new way to look at the world and our place in it - using gravity (or lack of) as a research tool.to further this valuable endeavour.

 

 

 

 

 

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