Cheer Up Quotes For Family Problems Essay

Life can get pretty rough sometimes and there is nothing worse than seeing a friend or a loved one in pain. Follow one or two of these easy tips on how to cheer someone up and make someone’s day better. You’ll feel good for having made the effort and the person being cheered up will learn how much you truly care.Life can get pretty rough sometimes and there is nothing worse than seeing a friend or a loved one in pain. Follow one or two of these easy tips on how to cheer someone up and make someone’s day better. You’ll feel good for having made the effort and the person being cheered up will learn how much you truly care.

1. Listen Up

When life gets overwhelming it helps to have someone willing to listen. Sometimes, a person just needs to vent. Allow the person you know to air out their problem. This does not put you in the position of solving the problem for them. There are times when a solution may present itself simply through talking to someone else. Your job is to listen and then let it go.

2. Give Hugs

It sounds so simple, it’s stupid. But hugging someone truly relieves stress and can make another feel a lot better. Hugging is a great stress reliever for both parties and is very helpful when there are no words. Research shows that oxytocin, a chemical that is a natural stress reliever, is released in the brain when hugging. A hug conveys loving care when mere words just won’t do.

3. Give Them a Handwritten Note or Card

Whether you are near or far, a handwritten note or card can be very meaningful. It shows you are paying attention and the card can be referred to again and again by the person who really needs a word of encouragement. You’ll also be demonstrating to someone that you cared enough to take the time to write out an encouraging message and send it. Take a few moments from your day to let someone who’s hurting know how much you care.

4. Have a Chuckle

The old adage, “Laughter is the best medicine,” certainly applies here. Help your friend or loved one to a good laugh at the situation. After all, nothing, not even pain—to paraphrase Charlie Chaplin—lasts forever. Use puns, jokes, or sarcasm to help another crack a hearty smile. Laughing just makes a person feel better and a good laugh might help to put a new spin or perspective on the situation.

5. Make Them Dinner

Click the link above to find foods that relieve stress. Plus, there is an added bonus to sharing food with another person; it gives them a chance to relax and perhaps more comfortably share their problem. Budgets are understandably tight these days, so the meal need not be expensive. Breaking bread with someone can be very calming, soothing, and relaxing. It may also help get the person’s mind off their troubles.

6. Share a Walk

Walking has a multitude of benefits, among them walking is a stress reliever. Taking a stroll through the neighborhood may be just the right thing for the person you know who needs cheering up. A walk is free and getting a little fresh air is very beneficial. Walking has a way of soothing nerves and serving to help someone who is tense to relax. Just the thing for someone who is experiencing a temporary set back.

7. Have a Movie Night

Gather some favorite snacks and share a movie. Click the link above for a list of movies that are sure to tickle the funny bone. If tears are in order, by all means grab a box of tissue and find a sad story. Sometimes, tears can be as cathartic as laughter. Or choose a movie, such as Steel Magnolias, that is a good mix of comedy and drama. Either way, a movie is a good way to help someone who is troubled take their mind off of the problem for a while.

8. A Spa Experience

Having a spa day need not be expensive. The above link provides tips for a DIY spa day treat. A spa day can be a real treat for you both. Relax, unwind, and simply enjoy one another’s company. Treat yourself and a friend or loved one and essentially “stop the world” for an hour or so. You’ll both feel relaxed, refreshed, and simply pampered. A spa day is just a great way to hit the ground running again.

9. Volunteer Together

Believe it or not, offering to volunteer is a great stress reliever. Research has definitively proven that volunteering helps a person sleep better, gain a new perspective, and raises self-esteem. There are many opportunities to lend a helping hand. Tutoring, homeless shelters, or any favored charity are all great places to get started. Plus, you’ll have the added benefit of a shared experience with someone who really needs the lift.

10. Host a Staycation

Have a getaway without going anywhere? Yes, it is indeed possible. Treat your pal or loved one by doing a thorough house cleaning. Or pack a picnic lunch for just the two of you and visit the local park. If there is a national park nearby, so much the better. Take an afternoon to enjoy the sights in your community that you may have otherwise taken for granted. Explore the nearby community for hidden treasures, you may be surprised at what you find.

Redecorating need not be expensive or time consuming. The real plus here is that a simple project can bring worlds of pleasure and a brand new perspective on things. Something as simple as rearranging furniture can bring a whole new look to a room. Raid the local secondhand store for used dinner plates and hang these to bring a new look to a room. Purchase some inexpensive frames and frame a child’s artwork to brighten a room.

12. Do Some Gardening

Working with plants and the soil is relaxing and a fantastic stress reliever. Team up and do some gardening, to which there are a number of benefits. You will be benefiting the environment, as well as sprucing up the home. Physical exertion is an added benefit, to help sleep better. Leave the phone inside in order to disconnect from the world; unwanted calls can be distracting and increase stress.

13. Ask Open-Ended Questions

Sometimes it helps to allow a friend or loved one to expand on their problem and a possible solution. Asking open-ended questions in order to enable a flow of ideas. Help by asking and by listening in return to relieve stress. You will assist the person through developing a sense of ownership of the problem and in developing a resolution to it. You will both benefit through increasing and strengthening communication skills.

14. Brainstorm

Sit down and allow the ideas to flow freely when seeking to resolve the situation. Take a piece of paper and write down ideas as they come without judgment. The key here is to write down ideas freely. Some may be silly and that is an absolutely perfect opportunity to spend some time giggling about a situation that is seemingly overwhelming. Brainstorming provides an opportunity to think about a problem and its possible solutions.

15. Be Silly

Take time to just be silly. Try the Schwarzenegger Soundboard to make silly messages for one another. Play a game of charades together. Tie an old pantyhose leg to a belt loop, drop in an orange, and try to knock a second orange past the goal line. If there is snow, go ahead and team up to build a silly snowman for the entire neighborhood to enjoy. Dress it up or down, it doesn’t matter just have a little fun.

16. Don’t Sympathize, Empathize

Feeling sorry for someone is no help. There was a time when you struggled and felt defeated. Use these feelings to put yourself in their shoes. You know how it feels and it feels very bad. Communicate your willingness to listen, while avoiding allowing the person to wallow in their mistake. In fact, your experience can help guide the other person back to being happy and productive.

17. Cry It Out

There are benefits to allowing the person to cry it out. While it may sound counterproductive, allowing someone to grieve their disappointment or loss often leads to better feelings. Having a good old-fashioned cry is a wonderful stress reliever. Negative emotions are released, making room for more positive thinking and feelings. Shedding tears has been found to release more than negativity, it has also been show to release poisons in the body.

18. Go Shopping

“Retail therapy” is sometimes disparaged. Give a quick lift by doing a little shopping. The spree need not be expensive. Set a budget and hit up secondhand, consignment, and thrift stores. Spend time together and purchase something that is entirely frivolous. If money is a problem, purchase and return the item later. Veer away from purchasing anything that is a “need.” This trip is all about a want, just remember to help your pal or loved one not to go overboard with spending.

19. Help Set Goals

Setting goals can be a tremendous help to someone who needs cheering up. Achieving small accomplishments can also lead to clearer thinking and mood improvement. The goals need not be complicated, but rather remain simple steps to achieving a set goal or objective. Sit down and help write out some achievable goals, such as planning a get-together. Anything that may prove to be productive is the key.

20. Simply Be There

Sometimes all you can do is simply be there and that is absolutely fine. Listening and caring is worth a great deal to someone who needs to be cheered up. At times, there are simply no right words in the moment that are soothing and not potentially inappropriate. Being generous with your time says volumes about how much you truly care. Time is an important commodity and the person you care for knows it.

21. Be A Friend

While it may seem simple, being a true friend is not always easy. Listening and caring for another takes time and energy, both well spent when investing in another person. Your friend will come to find this is only a temporary setback and one that can be conquered with loving support. Indeed, you are that loving support. Be a good friend and help another through by listening with an open mind and heart.

22. Make An Appreciation List

Sometimes it becomes easy to indulge in all that is going wrong. Cheer someone up through helping to show them what they have to be grateful for. This will help the person feel more grounded, more connected to the world around them and to you as a dear friend. Cultivating an appreciative attitude has been proven to lower depression, increase energy, and reduce insomnia. Even when life is at its lowest, there are people and things to be grateful for. Help through making a list of those things.

23. Distract, Distract, Distract

Spend time away from the problem. Cheer someone up through providing a pleasant distraction. Dust off a board game, play some cards, or simply talk about something else. This presents an opportunity to relax and take some “time off” from the problem. Certainly, this is only a temporary solution; at some point the problem may simply go away or must be tackled. However, that decision can and probably should wait. Now is the time to free up the mind and think of something else.

24. Seize The Problem

Sometimes the best solution is to help a friend or loved one face the problem head on. In other words—help! “Take the bull by the horns” and tackle the problem. The person in need of cheering up can “borrow” some of your strength and insight to find a workable solution. A forward momentum can also help the person get “unstuck” and move forward. While it is impossible to change the past, it is entirely possible to move ahead with confidence.

25. Think Positively

It is easy to wallow in self-pity. Help a friend lift themselves from that pit through the power of positive thinking. Redirect energy and focus toward moving forward, away from useless negative feelings, thoughts, and emotions. In this way, you will provide a boost of positive energy, enabling the person to stop the downward plunge into depression and ultimately loss of momentum. Try to find the “silver lining” in the situation to assist in moving forward.


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Having a bad day once in a while is inevitable, but you don’t have to stay that way. Just follow our 45 tips to boost your mind.

1. Have a warm drink.

It turns out the British might be onto something. A 2008 study found that hot beverages promote warm feelings. So go ahead, have that cup of tea.

2. Cuddle with an animal.

If you’ve ever had a teary night and a nearby pet, you already know that snuggling with Fido can do wonders for your mood. In fact, studies prove that petting an animal promotes the release of feel-good hormones like oxytocin, serotonin and prolactin. Don’t have a pet? We recommend borrowing a friend’s – heading to an animal shelter might just depress you more. Or just find cute animals on Instagram for similar benefits.

3. Look at positive quotes.

When you’re feeling down in the dumps, it’s nice to remind yourself that others have gone through similar trials and survived. Try collecting motivational quotes on Pinterest – our Inspiration board is a good place to start .

4. Call someone you love.

We all have someone who can always cheer us up. Call them, and don’t worry too much about bothering them. The people you love will be there when you need them. Just try to remember that when they call you up at 3AM in tears next year.

5. Watch a Disney movie.

What better way to cheer up than to watch a classic animated movie from your childhood? Just skip the unexpectedly teary ones, like Bambi and Up.

6. Go outside.

It’s tempting to mope around inside all day when you’re feeling low. But study after study shows that getting out into nature improves our moods. Enjoy the gorgeous summer weather and take a 20-minute walk outside – with plenty of sunscreen, of course!

7. Get creative.

Love to paint, write or cook? Channel your negative energy into a creative process. You’ll feel loads better and accomplish something to boot.

8. Take a hot shower or bath.

A study from the International Journal of Stress Management proved that anxiety and depression decrease nearly a quarter after taking a bath with food-grade Epsom salts. You could also take a hot shower if you’re looking for a more invigorating pick-me-up.

9. Have a little alcohol.

Ever cracked open a beer at the end of a long day? Wine and beer have both been shown to promote relaxation and reduce anxiety. Just avoid the Olivia Pope-sized glass: too much alcohol will depress you further, so keep it to one drink.

10. Take a deep breath.

There’s a reason people tell you to breathe deeply when they want you to relax. Deep breathing calms your body down and reduces production of cortisol, otherwise known as the stress hormone. Learn how to do it properly here.

11. Play happy music.

Remember when all those music videos of Pharrell’s Happy went viral? There’s a scientific explanation for why you couldn’t stop grooving to the beat, no matter how many times you’d heard the song. Not only does music trigger the release of dopamine, it affects the same areas that promote drug dependency – in some way, you can become addicted to music. Furthermore, an organ in your inner ear responds to frequencies in music and  is directly connected to the brain area responsible for pleasure. Of course, not all songs will improve your mood, just ones that are upbeat, in a major key and have uplifting lyrics. Create a playlist of happy songs, or try a Pandora station based on Happy.

12. Listen to nature.

Can’t get outside and not feeling the radio? Try listening to soothing nature sounds – we like a waterfall in the summer to relax and pretend we’re on a tropical island. Try this 8-hour video, buy a sound machine or try a free app.

13. Write in a journal.

Writing down your feelings in coherent sentences forces you to make more sense of them, thus reducing stress and anxiety. Want even more of a pick-me-up? Write a list of things you’re grateful for.

14. Make yourself laugh.

If you fake-laugh long enough, you’ll soon be laughing for real, producing endorphins and an all-around high. If that feels too ridiculous, find a funny Youtube video, like the ones listed here.

15. Babysit.

Have you ever tried to be depressed around a child? It’s almost impossible, since most children are relentlessly happy – or the things they’re sad about will make you laugh. So take a child off a frazzled parent’s hands; they’ll appreciate the ability to sip a mojito in the sun.

16. Watch your favorite TV show.

Some TV shows never fail to make us laugh, whether it’s The Office, Friends or How I Met Your Mother. Forget about your issues by getting lost in your favorite characters’ misadventures for 25 minutes.

17. Get dressed up (or down).

Some people feel happiest when dressed to the nines, while others are at their best lounging around in sweatpants. Rock whichever outfit works for you for an instant mood boost.

18. Clean your apartment.

Having trouble clearing your mind? Try clearing the surfaces around you could help. Cleaning your apartment will distract you from your troubles with a productive, cathartic task. Crank up the music and have a solo dance party for even more mood-boosting benefits.

19. Read a good book.

In a 34-year-long study, happy people were 21% more likely to read a newspaper. But current events are often depressing, so why not lose yourself in a good book instead? Just skip the Game of Thrones and go for something a little more uplifting, like Tina Fey’s hilarious memoir Bossypants.

20. Buy some flowers.

If flowers don’t make you sneeze uncontrollably, it pays off to keep a pot in your bedroom. Several studies have found that having flowers or floral scents around improves your mood. According to evolutionary psychologists, we see flowers as a promise of food, reward for our farming efforts, and a sign that we can safely inhabit a place. So go ahead, buy yourself a bouquet of roses on the way home.

21. Hug someone.

We already know that a hug makes us feel better, but now science proves it. Touching another person triggers a spike in oxytocin, the love hormone, and decreases cortisol, the stress hormone – even if it’s just a friendly handshake. Don’t turn down a friendly hug when you feel terrible; you need it.

22. Get off social media.

People post on social media to brag about their own lives – but studies show when you’re comparing that with your inner life, it can make you feel even more depressed.
So skip the social media for the day and opt for real human interaction instead, in person or via the phone.

23. Work out.

When you’re feeling upset, working out is the last thing you want to do. But just five minutes of exercise triggers the release of endorphins, a hormone which can boost your mood for up to 12 hours. You don’t even have to hit the gym – try the 7 minute workout.

24. Get grounded.

Have you ever wondered why it’s so relaxing to sink your bare feet into the grass? Grounding is the theory that “the earth’s magnetic field can lower stress hormones,” so touching the earth with your bare skin makes you feel better. So go outside and let your feet relax, or better yet, walk barefoot at the beach.

25. Don’t force it.

We want you to feel better quickly, but not too quickly! There’s nothing wrong with a bad mood, so don’t feel guilty about it. Forcing yourself to cheer up can cause you to internalize your negative emotions and make you feel worse in the long run. So allow yourself to be miserable until you’re ready to feel better.

26. Develop more habits.

Some researchers believe that when you use up too much of your willpower, you get irritated. If you’ve been in a bad mood lately, consider if you’re putting in more mental effort than you’re used to. Did you start a new diet, or have to work with a coworker you can’t stand? Try reducing your willpower usage in other areas of your life by automating your behavior. Otherwise, face your problems head-on by enlisting a support buddy to help you on your diet or to discuss your problems with your coworker.

27. Pamper yourself.

When was the last time you pampered yourself? If your answer is, “I can’t remember,” it’s time to take a little me time. Indulge in whatever your heart desires, whether that’s heading to a gun range or curling up in bed. And don’t forget to carve out an hour a day for yourself in the future. No matter how busy you are, it’s important to take care of yourself first.

28. Do something nice.

One surefire way to feel better on an awful day is to do something nice for a stranger. No matter how bad you feel, knowing you made someone else’s day will always cheer you up. Not sure what to do? Try one of our 60 Random Acts of Kindness.

29. Smile.

Since your facial muscles communicate directly with your brain, you can trick yourself into feeling happy by smiling. However, doing so can also repress your feelings and allow negativity to ‘leak’ into other areas of your life. For best results, think happy thoughts that naturally prompt a smile, turning up your mouth and crinkling your eyes for at least 30 seconds.

30. Have sex.

It’s no surprise that an orgasm will improve your mood. Intensify the benefits by having a thrust in the morning, so the boost in oxytocin keeps you feeling lovey-dovey all day long.

31. Plan a trip.

Retail therapy might boost your mood for a bit, but why not channel that energy into something a little more productive? Study after study shows that people are happier when they spend money on experiences instead of tangible items. Furthermore, people love planning trips – right before you leave for vacation is when you’re happiest. So stop by the travel agency while you’re at the mall, and don’t worry about breaking the bank. You get the same benefits whether you plan a day trip or an overseas haul.

32. Break a bad habit for a day.

We all have bad habits we ought to break, whether that’s smoking or saying ‘um’ far too often. So next time you’re in a bad mood, try stopping for just that day. A Brown University study found that even breaking a bad habit temporarily makes you feel happier for the duration that you refrain from it.

33. Have some chocolate.

Do you reach for a chocolate bar when you’ve had a crappy day? As long as you’re eating dark chocolate, you’re on the right track. Dark chocolate helps your brain release endorphins and serotonin, an anti-depressant, reduces cortisol levels, and contains chemicals that affect the brain similarly to marijuana. Plus, the abundance of antioxidants and other minerals help make it a guilt-free treat. Just keep your noshing to a few squares – binging isn’t healthy no matter how bad your mood is, unfortunately.

34. Let it out.

If you have an awful moment at work, hold in your feelings until you get home. But bottling up your frustrations for too long is unhealthy. Cry your eyes out if you need to – it reduces tension and will help you feel better. Just don’t let it go on too long! It’s only healthy to wallow in your feelings for a little while; then you need to start moving on with your life.

35. Savor everyday moments.

Bad moods cause us to focus on the negativity in our lives and overlook the good, but it’s savoring the good that makes us happier. So spend a minute appreciating something positive in your life. Just watching a simple sunset, when viewed with gratitude, will remind you there’s still lots to be happy about and that your bad day isn’t the end of the world.

36. Have some water.

Dehydration brings with it a host of problems, including increased irritability. If you’ve been feeling terrible all day and can’t figure out why, try drinking a glass of water. You might be surprised at how much better you feel.

37. Play.

When was the last time you played? It’s not just for kids – play is an important part of enjoying adult life, and what better time to do it in the summer? You might feel a little ridiculous, but we guarantee that swinging on the swings will make you feel better any day of the year. So let out your inner child by frolicking at the park or beach, or dust off a good old-fashioned board games. Just maybe skip the Monopoly.

38. Look at blue.

According to color psychology, looking at the color blue relaxes your mind. Studies have yet to back this up, but hey, it can’t hurt, right? If you hate blue, try another color that puts you in a good mood – we like light pinks and greens.

39. Speed up your thinking.

A 2009 study showed that thinking quickly makes you feel more powerful, energetic and happy. So how do you do that? Try imposing a time limit on solving a riddle, or watch a movie in fast-forward.

40. Get into the flow.

When you’re in a flow state, you become so immersed in what you’re doing you forget about the world around you. It’s just what the doctor ordered on a bad day. If you’ve ever been in a flow state, you know exactly what activity will get you there, so hop to it! Otherwise, you can find a little help from Steven Kotler’s presentation on hacking flow.

41. Set 3 goals for the day.

Sometimes, bad moods can overwhelm you and make you think you have no control over your life. Regain some of that control (and your good mood) by setting 3 simple goals for the day. They don’t have to be major, just as long as they’re achievable. The sense of productivity is small, but worth it.

42. Take a nap.

When all you want to do is curl up in a ball and avoid the world for a while, try taking a nap. It’ll fulfill your antisocial tendencies and let you recharge for a little. Just make sure you do it in a way that won’t ruin your sleep that night.

43. Hang out with your loved ones.

A good social circle is key to happiness, so don’t be afraid to lean on your loved ones when you need to. Whether you want to drink your problems away or rant and dissect every little detail of what went wrong, your loved ones are happy to do it with you and will make you laugh in the process. Just maybe avoid the Debbie Downer in the group for the day.

44. Meditate for 15 minutes.

Meditation is a great stress-relief technique, which makes it especially beautiful on a rough day. If you still have a long day ahead of you, spend 15 minutes focusing on your breath, and let your mind wander for a fast pick-me-up.

45. Turn off your phone.

A Swedish study found that being constantly available stresses you out. So turn off your phone and log some off-screen time. If enjoying your summer isn’t enough motivation, we’ve got 10 more reasons to ignore the buzzing in your pocket here.

How do you cheer up on a bad day? Let us know in the comments, on Facebook or Tweet us @SuperheroYou!

Photo Credit: Camdiluv ♥ via Compfightcc

Written by Sasha Graffagna

Having a bad day once in a while is inevitable, but you don’t have to stay that way. Just follow our 45 tips to boost your mind.

1. Have a warm drink.

It turns out the British might be onto something. A 2008 study found that hot beverages promote warm feelings. So go ahead, have that cup of tea.

2. Cuddle with an animal.

If you’ve ever had a teary night and a nearby pet, you already know that snuggling with Fido can do wonders for your mood. In fact, studies prove that petting an animal promotes the release of feel-good hormones like oxytocin, serotonin and prolactin. Don’t have a pet? We recommend borrowing a friend’s – heading to an animal shelter might just depress you more. Or just find cute animals on Instagram for similar benefits.

3. Look at positive quotes.

When you’re feeling down in the dumps, it’s nice to remind yourself that others have gone through similar trials and survived. Try collecting motivational quotes on Pinterest – our Inspiration board is a good place to start .

4. Call someone you love.

We all have someone who can always cheer us up. Call them, and don’t worry too much about bothering them. The people you love will be there when you need them. Just try to remember that when they call you up at 3AM in tears next year.

5. Watch a Disney movie.

What better way to cheer up than to watch a classic animated movie from your childhood? Just skip the unexpectedly teary ones, like Bambi and Up.

6. Go outside.

It’s tempting to mope around inside all day when you’re feeling low. But study after study shows that getting out into nature improves our moods. Enjoy the gorgeous summer weather and take a 20-minute walk outside – with plenty of sunscreen, of course!

7. Get creative.

Love to paint, write or cook? Channel your negative energy into a creative process. You’ll feel loads better and accomplish something to boot.

8. Take a hot shower or bath.

A study from the International Journal of Stress Management proved that anxiety and depression decrease nearly a quarter after taking a bath with food-grade Epsom salts. You could also take a hot shower if you’re looking for a more invigorating pick-me-up.

9. Have a little alcohol.

Ever cracked open a beer at the end of a long day? Wine and beer have both been shown to promote relaxation and reduce anxiety. Just avoid the Olivia Pope-sized glass: too much alcohol will depress you further, so keep it to one drink.

10. Take a deep breath.

There’s a reason people tell you to breathe deeply when they want you to relax. Deep breathing calms your body down and reduces production of cortisol, otherwise known as the stress hormone. Learn how to do it properly here.

11. Play happy music.

Remember when all those music videos of Pharrell’s Happy went viral? There’s a scientific explanation for why you couldn’t stop grooving to the beat, no matter how many times you’d heard the song. Not only does music trigger the release of dopamine, it affects the same areas that promote drug dependency – in some way, you can become addicted to music. Furthermore, an organ in your inner ear responds to frequencies in music and  is directly connected to the brain area responsible for pleasure. Of course, not all songs will improve your mood, just ones that are upbeat, in a major key and have uplifting lyrics. Create a playlist of happy songs, or try a Pandora station based on Happy.

12. Listen to nature.

Can’t get outside and not feeling the radio? Try listening to soothing nature sounds – we like a waterfall in the summer to relax and pretend we’re on a tropical island. Try this 8-hour video, buy a sound machine or try a free app.

13. Write in a journal.

Writing down your feelings in coherent sentences forces you to make more sense of them, thus reducing stress and anxiety. Want even more of a pick-me-up? Write a list of things you’re grateful for.

14. Make yourself laugh.

If you fake-laugh long enough, you’ll soon be laughing for real, producing endorphins and an all-around high. If that feels too ridiculous, find a funny Youtube video, like the ones listed here.

15. Babysit.

Have you ever tried to be depressed around a child? It’s almost impossible, since most children are relentlessly happy – or the things they’re sad about will make you laugh. So take a child off a frazzled parent’s hands; they’ll appreciate the ability to sip a mojito in the sun.

16. Watch your favorite TV show.

Some TV shows never fail to make us laugh, whether it’s The Office, Friends or How I Met Your Mother. Forget about your issues by getting lost in your favorite characters’ misadventures for 25 minutes.

17. Get dressed up (or down).

Some people feel happiest when dressed to the nines, while others are at their best lounging around in sweatpants. Rock whichever outfit works for you for an instant mood boost.

18. Clean your apartment.

Having trouble clearing your mind? Try clearing the surfaces around you could help. Cleaning your apartment will distract you from your troubles with a productive, cathartic task. Crank up the music and have a solo dance party for even more mood-boosting benefits.

19. Read a good book.

In a 34-year-long study, happy people were 21% more likely to read a newspaper. But current events are often depressing, so why not lose yourself in a good book instead? Just skip the Game of Thrones and go for something a little more uplifting, like Tina Fey’s hilarious memoir Bossypants.

20. Buy some flowers.

If flowers don’t make you sneeze uncontrollably, it pays off to keep a pot in your bedroom. Several studies have found that having flowers or floral scents around improves your mood. According to evolutionary psychologists, we see flowers as a promise of food, reward for our farming efforts, and a sign that we can safely inhabit a place. So go ahead, buy yourself a bouquet of roses on the way home.

21. Hug someone.

We already know that a hug makes us feel better, but now science proves it. Touching another person triggers a spike in oxytocin, the love hormone, and decreases cortisol, the stress hormone – even if it’s just a friendly handshake. Don’t turn down a friendly hug when you feel terrible; you need it.

22. Get off social media.

People post on social media to brag about their own lives – but studies show when you’re comparing that with your inner life, it can make you feel even more depressed.
So skip the social media for the day and opt for real human interaction instead, in person or via the phone.

23. Work out.

When you’re feeling upset, working out is the last thing you want to do. But just five minutes of exercise triggers the release of endorphins, a hormone which can boost your mood for up to 12 hours. You don’t even have to hit the gym – try the 7 minute workout.

24. Get grounded.

Have you ever wondered why it’s so relaxing to sink your bare feet into the grass? Grounding is the theory that “the earth’s magnetic field can lower stress hormones,” so touching the earth with your bare skin makes you feel better. So go outside and let your feet relax, or better yet, walk barefoot at the beach.

25. Don’t force it.

We want you to feel better quickly, but not too quickly! There’s nothing wrong with a bad mood, so don’t feel guilty about it. Forcing yourself to cheer up can cause you to internalize your negative emotions and make you feel worse in the long run. So allow yourself to be miserable until you’re ready to feel better.

26. Develop more habits.

Some researchers believe that when you use up too much of your willpower, you get irritated. If you’ve been in a bad mood lately, consider if you’re putting in more mental effort than you’re used to. Did you start a new diet, or have to work with a coworker you can’t stand? Try reducing your willpower usage in other areas of your life by automating your behavior. Otherwise, face your problems head-on by enlisting a support buddy to help you on your diet or to discuss your problems with your coworker.

27. Pamper yourself.

When was the last time you pampered yourself? If your answer is, “I can’t remember,” it’s time to take a little me time. Indulge in whatever your heart desires, whether that’s heading to a gun range or curling up in bed. And don’t forget to carve out an hour a day for yourself in the future. No matter how busy you are, it’s important to take care of yourself first.

28. Do something nice.

One surefire way to feel better on an awful day is to do something nice for a stranger. No matter how bad you feel, knowing you made someone else’s day will always cheer you up. Not sure what to do? Try one of our 60 Random Acts of Kindness.

29. Smile.

Since your facial muscles communicate directly with your brain, you can trick yourself into feeling happy by smiling. However, doing so can also repress your feelings and allow negativity to ‘leak’ into other areas of your life. For best results, think happy thoughts that naturally prompt a smile, turning up your mouth and crinkling your eyes for at least 30 seconds.

30. Have sex.

It’s no surprise that an orgasm will improve your mood. Intensify the benefits by having a thrust in the morning, so the boost in oxytocin keeps you feeling lovey-dovey all day long.

31. Plan a trip.

Retail therapy might boost your mood for a bit, but why not channel that energy into something a little more productive? Study after study shows that people are happier when they spend money on experiences instead of tangible items. Furthermore, people love planning trips – right before you leave for vacation is when you’re happiest. So stop by the travel agency while you’re at the mall, and don’t worry about breaking the bank. You get the same benefits whether you plan a day trip or an overseas haul.

32. Break a bad habit for a day.

We all have bad habits we ought to break, whether that’s smoking or saying ‘um’ far too often. So next time you’re in a bad mood, try stopping for just that day. A Brown University study found that even breaking a bad habit temporarily makes you feel happier for the duration that you refrain from it.

33. Have some chocolate.

Do you reach for a chocolate bar when you’ve had a crappy day? As long as you’re eating dark chocolate, you’re on the right track. Dark chocolate helps your brain release endorphins and serotonin, an anti-depressant, reduces cortisol levels, and contains chemicals that affect the brain similarly to marijuana. Plus, the abundance of antioxidants and other minerals help make it a guilt-free treat. Just keep your noshing to a few squares – binging isn’t healthy no matter how bad your mood is, unfortunately.

34. Let it out.

If you have an awful moment at work, hold in your feelings until you get home. But bottling up your frustrations for too long is unhealthy. Cry your eyes out if you need to – it reduces tension and will help you feel better. Just don’t let it go on too long! It’s only healthy to wallow in your feelings for a little while; then you need to start moving on with your life.

35. Savor everyday moments.

Bad moods cause us to focus on the negativity in our lives and overlook the good, but it’s savoring the good that makes us happier. So spend a minute appreciating something positive in your life. Just watching a simple sunset, when viewed with gratitude, will remind you there’s still lots to be happy about and that your bad day isn’t the end of the world.

36. Have some water.

Dehydration brings with it a host of problems, including increased irritability. If you’ve been feeling terrible all day and can’t figure out why, try drinking a glass of water. You might be surprised at how much better you feel.

37. Play.

When was the last time you played? It’s not just for kids – play is an important part of enjoying adult life, and what better time to do it in the summer? You might feel a little ridiculous, but we guarantee that swinging on the swings will make you feel better any day of the year. So let out your inner child by frolicking at the park or beach, or dust off a good old-fashioned board games. Just maybe skip the Monopoly.

38. Look at blue.

According to color psychology, looking at the color blue relaxes your mind. Studies have yet to back this up, but hey, it can’t hurt, right? If you hate blue, try another color that puts you in a good mood – we like light pinks and greens.

39. Speed up your thinking.

A 2009 study showed that thinking quickly makes you feel more powerful, energetic and happy. So how do you do that? Try imposing a time limit on solving a riddle, or watch a movie in fast-forward.

40. Get into the flow.

When you’re in a flow state, you become so immersed in what you’re doing you forget about the world around you. It’s just what the doctor ordered on a bad day. If you’ve ever been in a flow state, you know exactly what activity will get you there, so hop to it! Otherwise, you can find a little help from Steven Kotler’s presentation on hacking flow.

41. Set 3 goals for the day.

Sometimes, bad moods can overwhelm you and make you think you have no control over your life. Regain some of that control (and your good mood) by setting 3 simple goals for the day. They don’t have to be major, just as long as they’re achievable. The sense of productivity is small, but worth it.

42. Take a nap.

When all you want to do is curl up in a ball and avoid the world for a while, try taking a nap. It’ll fulfill your antisocial tendencies and let you recharge for a little. Just make sure you do it in a way that won’t ruin your sleep that night.

43. Hang out with your loved ones.

A good social circle is key to happiness, so don’t be afraid to lean on your loved ones when you need to. Whether you want to drink your problems away or rant and dissect every little detail of what went wrong, your loved ones are happy to do it with you and will make you laugh in the process. Just maybe avoid the Debbie Downer in the group for the day.

44. Meditate for 15 minutes.

Meditation is a great stress-relief technique, which makes it especially beautiful on a rough day. If you still have a long day ahead of you, spend 15 minutes focusing on your breath, and let your mind wander for a fast pick-me-up.

45. Turn off your phone.

A Swedish study found that being constantly available stresses you out. So turn off your phone and log some off-screen time. If enjoying your summer isn’t enough motivation, we’ve got 10 more reasons to ignore the buzzing in your pocket here.

How do you cheer up on a bad day? Let us know in the comments, on Facebook or Tweet us @SuperheroYou!

Photo Credit: Camdiluv ♥ via Compfightcc

Written by Sasha Graffagna

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