Cover Letter Sample Yourself Example

Letter of Introduction Examples and Writing Tips

Do you need to write a letter introducing yourself to a prospective employer, a networking contact, or a potential new client? A well-written letter of introduction can help you find a new job or acquire a new client. Why and how should you send a letter, email, or LinkedIn message introducing yourself?

The best way to get hired is through networking. Over 80 percent of job seekers say that networking has helped them find a new job.

However, this doesn’t mean that every networking success story involves a direct connection. Sometimes, it’s less about who you know, and more about who your friends know. A letter of introduction is one way to forge a connection with someone you don’t (yet) know.

Types of Introduction Letters

There are two types of letters of introduction. In the first type, you introduce a connection to someone else you know. That someone might be a potential candidate for employment, or someone looking for career assistance.

In the other type of letter of introduction, you write to someone you haven’t met. You introduce yourself and ask them to refer you to a job opportunity or request assistance with a job search.

A letter of introduction can be a useful way to network and gain job search advice (and even a possible job opportunity). Read below for tips and letter examples.

Letter of Introduction Writing Tips

The most important tip to remember when writing a letter of introduction is to keep it short and to the point.

The person you are contacting is busy, and you want to get his or her attention right away.

First, include a quick introduction that explains who you are – or, if you are connecting two people, concisely introduce the other person.

Then, briefly explain what you intend to accomplish by sending your letter.

Does the other person wish to apply for a job opening? Are you hoping to set up an informational interview for yourself? Be as clear as possible.

Conclude with a description of how the recipient of the letter can either get in touch with you or the third party. Make it as easy as possible for the recipient to respond.

When writing your letter, make sure the tone matches your relationship. If you are very close friends, you can write in a slightly less formal style. However, if you are introducing yourself for the first time, make sure your letter is extremely professional.

Whether or not you are already acquaintances, be sure to thoroughly edit your letter before sending it. In many cases, the letter can be sent via email, because that's the quickest and easiest way to connect.

Other Types of Letters

People often confuse a letter of introduction with other types of job search letters. For example, a letter of introduction is not a cover letter. A cover letter is a document sent with your resume and other job application materials. It explains why you are qualified for the specific job for which you are applying.

A letter of introduction is also not a referral letter. A referral letter is a letter you write to someone after you have been put in contact with him or her (often through a letter of introduction).

In a referral letter, you begin by explaining which of your mutual acquaintances suggested you reach out. You then make your request – perhaps you are looking to conduct an informational interview or to learn about job opportunities.

Letter of Introduction Example: Introducing Two People

Dear Bob, (this type of letter is typically sent to someone you know well)

I'm writing to introduce you to Janice Dolan.

I know Janice through the Brandon Theater Group, where, as you know, I am the technical director. Janice and I have worked together on several local theater projects. She is a terrific stage manager with over 10 years of experience.

Janice is interested in relocating to the San Francisco area in the near future and would appreciate any recommendations you could offer her for conducting a job search for a theater position and any help you can provide with the logistics of relocating to California.

I've attached her resume for your review and you can contact her at janicedolan@email.com or 555-555-5555. Thank you in advance for any assistance you can provide.

Sincerely,

Barbara Smith

Letter of Introduction Example: Introducing Yourself

Dear Mr. Randall,

My name is Katherine Sussman, and I am currently a recruitment associate for XYZ Recruiting. I have been working as a recruiter for the past three years.

I am interested in moving from recruitment work in a large corporation to internal recruitment for a nonprofit. I used to work in development for ABC Nonprofit and would love to bring my current skills to a similar nonprofit. I know you do this kind of work for Sunshine Nonprofit, and I would appreciate hearing a bit about your experience in this field. I would love to arrange a time to meet with you for an informational interview.

I have attached my resume for your review. If you have time for a brief conversation, please let me know. You can contact me via email (ksussman@email.com) or phone (555-555-5555). I look forward to hearing from you. Thank you so much.

Best,

Katherine Sussman

Read More:Letter Writing Tips | Letter of Interest Example for a Job | Referral Cover Letters

By Mike Simpson

There comes a time in nearly every job seekers life when you plop yourself down in front of the computer and say to yourself…

“Okay, it’s time to find a couple good cover letter examples I can use to help me start writing my cover letter…” 

So you do a quick Google search, grab the first three cover letter samples you can find, copy a paragraph from each one, and then you’re off to the races feeling like now all you have to do is “click send” a few times and the interviews will simply start rolling in.

Consider this a gentle wake-up call.

Why Your Cover Letter Is So Important?

In this ultra-competitive job market, it’s just not good enough to “Frankenstein” together a cover letter from the various bits and pieces you find online.

Why?

Because hiring managers have “been there, done that.” In other words, they’ve seen it all before.

Not only that, but they want to find candidates that are unique, interesting, and take the time and make the effort to present the best version of themselves.

Your cover letter is your first impression, and therefore, you want to craft the best darn cover letter your hiring manager has ever seen.

So you want to take the time and select the cover letter example that is “tailored” to your situation… in other words, the example cover letter that fits your personality, skills and abilities the best.

Example cover letters are kind of like shoes.

Sure, you might absolutely love that pair of Air Jordan IV’s that are still fresh in the box in your closet from 1989, but you might want to have a second thought before you consider wearing them to a wedding with a tuxedo.

Or perhaps you’ve got a pair of high heels that make you feel like you could walk into a business lunch at the Four Seasons and walk out having sold your company for a billion dollars?

Would you feel the same way if you showed up at the start line for the half marathon you signed up for with those same heels on?

Okay, ridiculous examples aside, I hope you can begin to see my point.

There is not one example cover letter for every situation… no “one-cover-letter-fits-all” solution.

You have to carefully evaluate your situation and decide which cover letter example is going to suit you the most.

What kind of work are you looking for?

Full-time?  Or part-time?  There’s a cover letter for that.

Are you sending a cover letter in the mail or by email?  There’s a cover letter for that too.

There are all kinds of situations that warrant a slightly different cover letter, and it’s imperative that you figure out which one fits you best.

But don’t worry.  To help, we’ve compiled a list of 12 of the most common cover letter examples and provided you with an example of a cover letter for each one.

So take a look at the examples and carefully decide which one fits your situation the most.

Before you dive in, a word to the wise…

Don’t just grab the one that fits you best, change the contact information and then start sending it out. As I said before, hiring managers are pretty smart and will be able to tell that you haven’t taken any time to make it your own.

If you want to get job interviews from your cover letter (and at some point, job offers as well!), you need to “tailor” the cover letter to demonstrate your skills, abilities and relevant experience.

Mike's Tip: Once you find a cover letter example that fits your situation, head over to our article How To Write A Cover Letter 101 and use the article to make sure that your cover letter contains all of the important things that hiring managers look for. We'll help you make sure that your cover letter is so irresistible that you'll get an interview from almost every application you submit!

12 Common Cover Letter Examples

Without further ado, here are 12 of the best cover letter examples for nearly every situation you could find yourself in along with a brief description of what makes the style of cover letter unique.

1. Cover Letter Sample For Part-Time Work

If you have no intention of applying for a full-time position, it is very important that you let the hiring manager know this in your cover letter.  After all, if you don’t mention this right up front, anything that comes after this will be a total waste of time, and hiring managers value their time more than anything.

On a side note, you should never really be applying for a full-time position when you are only available as a part-time worker.  The company has very specific needs, so don’t think they are going to change the entire nature of the position to accommodate your availability.

2. For A New Graduate

Cover letters for new graduates can often be tricky, because generally speaking, new graduates don’t usually have much experience.

So how can you still put yourself forward as a good candidate without experience?  You want to focus the cover letter around your skills and abilities, the extra-curricular work you’ve accomplished and your knowledge of the company (and passion for the industry) you’re applying to.

3. When You Have Been Referred

There isn’t anything overly difficult about writing a cover letter when you have been referred by someone else, but the most important thing to know is where you should bring up the referral.

Generally speaking, it is always best to mention your referral in the opening paragraph, because it acts as an attention grabber for the hiring manager.

You’re hoping they’ll think to themselves something along the lines of, “Oh, this person was referred by Jim.  I like Jim…he’s a straight shooter. If this person is good enough for Jim, he’s good enough for me. I’m going to bring him in for an interview…”

4. Cold Call Cover Letter Example

The cold call cover letter is appropriate when you are applying to a position that is not necessarily listed on a job board or advertised anywhere.  And for that reason, it can be a little tricky.

You really need to blow the hiring manager away in order for them to grant an unsolicited interview request, so there a re a few key things to remember.  Most importantly, you really have to do your research and demonstrate that you know the company and position inside out.

After that, it really pays to address the letter to a specific person.  Simply writing “To Whom It May Concern” is a great way to have the letter filed under G (for those keeping track that’s the Garbage).

Finally, this letter needs to be all about “pizazz”. Since the reader wasn’t expecting to receive this, you really need to catch their attention and sell yourself, but most importantly, quickly demonstrate how you will add value to their company.

5. For An Email Submission

Please please PLEASE be careful with this one.

Just because a job posting says “submit your cover letter and resume via email”, doesn’t necessarily mean that you can just put these documents in the body of an email.

More often than not, the posting will give further instructions that include attaching your cover letter and resume to an email.  Anyone who doesn’t follow this step has a ZERO chance of being brought in for an interview.

Why?  Because you can’t follow simple directions.

Now, if there is no stipulation and you determine that using the email body to send your cover letter is okay, then general cover letter writing rules apply.

Where you want to focus your energy is on the subject line.  Don’t just write whatever comes to mind as a throwaway and whatever you do, don’t leave it empty!  Be clear and concise about what is included in the email and identify the position you are applying for.

6.  For A Recruiter

Recruiters are no different than hiring managers, in that they are essentially looking for the same things from your cover letters.  What impresses a recruiter the most is when you take the time to tailor your cover letter to a specific posting rather than simply sending them a general letter inquiring about “miscellaneous opportunities”.

7. Someone Changing Careers

Generally speaking, if you are changing careers, you’ll be short on experience.  So similarly to the “New Graduate” cover letter, you’ll want to put the focus on your reasons for making the career change along with your relevant skills and abilities and how your experience in your past career will translate to your new career.

And remember, enthusiasm goes a long way. Hiring managers get excited about applicants that really show a desire to succeed in the role and industry they are applying to.

So make sure you do your research and know the position and industry inside out so that you are easily able to show how enthusiastic you are about the opportunity and how determined you are to get started on your new career path.

8. A Great Example of a Cover Letter For An Academic

The trick with an academic cover letter is to avoid rambling on and on and on about everything you’ve accomplished.  The reality is, you still need to fall within the “one-page rule” (although some institutions will allow for a second page, you better make darn sure that this is the case!), so the trick is to be clear and concise and highlight your accomplishments without coming across as an encyclopedia.

One other thing to consider is the nature of any research you have done and how you want to convey that in your cover letter.

Quite often people spend too much time talking about what it is they study or plan on studying without ever getting into the “why” of it all.

Be specific about your intentions and don’t assume that the person on the other end of your cover letter is an expert in your field.

9. For An Internship

There really isn’t a huge difference between writing a cover letter for an internship and writing a cover letter for a job opening.  You still need to list your qualifications, skills and abilities.  You still need to explain how you add value to the company.  You still want to sell yourself.

But one thing you want to keep in mind, is even though this internship might be a springboard to YOUR career or education, you don’t want this to be the focus of your cover letter.

The name of the game is still to put the company’s needs ahead of your own.

You’re not their first intern and you won’t be their last, so don’t write your cover letter thinking that their concern is how the internship will help with your placement in your next opportunity.

Add value. Period.  This is what they really want to hear from you in your cover letter.

10. Direct Mail

A direct mail cover letter is similar to a cold call cover letter, the main difference being you are not applying to a single company with a single position in mind.  Instead, you are “blanketing” as many companies you can at once and therefore trying to send out a general cover letter that can work for them all.

Because of this, we don’t recommend this strategy to our students.  It is generally pretty ineffective and a waste of your time or resources.

There is rarely a time when “tailoring” your resume to a specific company and position is not the most effective strategy.  However, if you are really short on time (and possibly ambition), here is an example of a direct mail cover letter you can reference.

11. Responding To an Advertisement

The only really distinguishing feature of this type of cover letter is that the opening paragraph generally includes a statement such as “I’m responding to your advertisement I saw in the…”

The rest of the cover letter generally follows the principles of other successful cover letters.  However, if you find yourself going through the classifieds in your local newspaper and simply sending off cover letters to whomever has an ad posted, do make sure that you do some research on the company before you send out your cover letter.

Sending one cover letter out for multiple advertisements is a good way to ensure that you won’t be getting too many interviews in the coming days or weeks.

12. When You’re Unemployed

The worst thing you can do when writing an cover letter after you’ve been unemployed for some time is to lie.

Why?  Because eventually, the lies you tell in the cover letter will come home to roost at some point in the interview process, meaning you’ll just end up having wasted everyone’s time.

Having said that, if there are some less-than-attractive reasons for your unemployment, don’t make those reasons the focus of your cover letter. You want to keep it positive.

It’s okay to admit fault in certain situations if you can show that you’ve have learned from the tough times and have changed for the better as a result of these struggles.

Transition to focusing on your skills and abilities, and more importantly, your passion and desire for re-entering the workforce. If you have experience from your past that will clearly add value to this new position, than don’t be afraid to clearly demonstrate the connection.

And if you spent your time being unemployed trying to better yourself (for example, taking a class or volunteering), then shift the focus to that.

Putting It All Together

So there you have 12 good cover letter examples for 2017 that will help you get started on crafting a winning cover letter.

Remember that the most important thing for you to accomplish with your cover letter is to demonstrate how you add value to the company you are applying to, and you want to make sure this never gets lost when you get caught up in trying to sell yourself.

And remember, you’re not on your own! Once you’ve chosen your cover letter example you can head over to How to Write a Cover Letter 101 and get great tips on how to right all parts of your cover letter.

Best of luck to you!

Please be kind and rate this post 🙂

 

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12 Great Cover Letter Examples for 2018

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FREE: "Perfect Cover Letter" PDF CHEAT SHEET

Get our handy "Perfect Cover Letter" cheat sheet.

In it you'll get a step-by-step process that will let you craft the perfect cover letter.

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